FRATERNAL FILMS
Apr 14

(Source: bluemavor, via tribecafilm)

Dogberry

PRONUNCIATION:
(DOG-ber-ee, -buh-ree) 

MEANING:
noun: A pompous, incompetent, self-important official.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Dogberry, a constable in Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, in which he goes about his blundering ways while mouthing malapropisms http://wordsmith.org/words/malapropism.html . Earliest documented use: 1801.

USAGE:
"Why doesn’t he do something, then? Ignorant Dogberry! Useless bumpkin! Calls himself a copper and doesn’t even know where to start!"
Edmund Crispin; The Glimpses of the Moon; Gollancz; 1977.

"The mayor of Bangor, Maine, vetoed a time-altering resolution passed by its city council … for which Railway Age lampooned him in an editorial that began ‘A Dogberry who holds the office of mayor.’"
Jack Beatty; Age of Betrayal; Knopf; 2007.
Apr 13
DOGBERRY

"Words are loaded pistols."

- Jean-Paul Sartre (via quotes-shape-us)

Apr 13

sashay

PRONUNCIATION:
(sa-SHAY) 

MEANING:
verb intr.:
1. To move, walk, or glide along nonchalantly.
2. To strut or move in a showy manner.
ETYMOLOGY:
From switching of syllables in a mispronunciation of French chassé (a ballet movement involving gliding steps with the same foot always leading), past participle of chasser (to chase), from captare (to try to catch), frequentative of Latin capere (to take). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kap- (to grasp), which also gave us captive, capsule, chassis, cable, occupy, deceive, behoof, caitiffpercipientcaptious, and gaff. Earliest documented use: 1836.

USAGE:
"Tyler switched to 6th Street, the car swaying and sashaying through the leafy old homes of Hancock Park."
Denise Hamilton; Damage Control; Scribner; 2011. 
Apr 11
SASHAY

viperine

PRONUNCIATION:
(VY-puhr-in, -puh-ryn) 

MEANING:
adjective: Of or relating to a viper; venomous; malicious.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin vipera (snake), which arose from a mispronunciation/contraction of vivipera, from vivus (alive) + parere (to give birth). Vipers are named so because most vipers give birth to live young (instead of eggs). The eggs stay within the mother’s body till they are ready to hatch. Earliest documented use: around 1540.

USAGE:
"The musical taught a generation of viperine office politicians how to stick a shiv into their bosses without leaving any fingerprints on the handle."
Terry Teachout; Lovable, Huggable, and Unscrupulous Too; The Wall Street Journal (New York); Mar 29, 2011. 

See more usage examples of viperine in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 11
VIPERINE
Apr 10

Opening credits: Spike Jonze 

(Source: spikejonzze, via cinematographic)

Apr 9

tribecafilm:

Here are 22 Comedies Playing at TFF 2014

"I am mine. before I am ever anyone else’s."

- in, nayyirah waheed (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: nayyirahwaheed, via thatkindofwoman)

Apr 9

arrant

PRONUNCIATION:
(AR-uhnt) 

MEANING:
adjective: Complete; thorough.
ETYMOLOGY:
Here’s a word that has had both its spelling and meaning bent out of shape from use. It’s a variant of errant (wandering). Earlier the word was used in the sense of wandering or vagrant, for example, an arrant thief or an arrant knave. Over time the word began to be taken as an intensifier so an arrant fool was no longer a vagrant fool, but a complete fool.
Via French, from Latin iterare (to journey), from iter (journey). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ei- (to go), which is also the ancestor of words such as exit, transit, circuit, itinerary, obituary, and adit. Earliest documented use: 1386.

USAGE:
"Norman Macrae also dismissed the Club of Rome’s prediction that the world was about to run out of food as arrant nonsense."
The Unacknowledged Giant; The Economist (London, UK); Jun 17, 2010. 

See more usage examples of arrant in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 9
ARRANT

ambage

PRONUNCIATION:
(AM-bij) 

MEANING:
noun: Ambiguity; circumlocution.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Middle English ambages (equivocation), taken as a plural and the singular ambage coined from it. From Latin ambages, from ambi- (both, around) + agere (to drive). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ag- (to drive, draw, or move), which also gave us act, agent, agitate, litigate, synagogue, ambassador, agonistesaxiomaticcogentincogitantexigentexiguous,intransigent. Earliest documented use: 1374.

USAGE:
"This increase in ambage measures increased arbitrariness."
Harrison C. White; Identity and Control; Princeton University Press; 2008. 

See more usage examples of ambage in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 9
AMBAGE
Apr 7

classichorrorblog:

Ghostbusters (1984)

love it

(via nationalfilmsociety)

zodiaccity:

Taurus is very laid-back, but things will likely turn for the worse if you try to aggressively dominate them. They’re not ones to be controlled….at all.
Apr 7

zodiaccity:

Taurus is very laid-back, but things will likely turn for the worse if you try to aggressively dominate them. They’re not ones to be controlled….at all.

hitrecord:

"We Are All Made of Stars"
Image by ericacoburn
HERE on hitRECord
Apr 7

hitrecord:

"We Are All Made of Stars"

Image by ericacoburn

HERE on hitRECord

"Hoping for the best, prepared for the worst, and unsurprised by anything in between."

- Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (via quotes-shape-us)

Apr 6