FRATERNAL FILMS
Jul 16

David Fincher Filmography

(Source: taylors1928, via cinematographic)

huffingtonpost:


Weird al’s ‘Word Crimes’ is the ‘Blurred Lines’ parody every grammar nerd secretly wanted so watch it here.

I love this!
Jul 16

huffingtonpost:

Weird al’s ‘Word Crimes’ is the ‘Blurred Lines’ parody every grammar nerd secretly wanted so watch it here.

I love this!

Jul 16

evilnol6:

.”Another Earth” directed by Mike Cahill, and written by Cahill and Brit Marling 

(via foxsearchlightpictures)

Jul 15

micdotcom:

Watch: 16 short films that launched the careers of now-famous directors

Follow micdotcom

(via afi-afifest)

"I ain’t afraid to love a man. I ain’t afraid to shoot him, either."

- Annie Oakley (via heyho-letsgo-riderkick)

(via brokenmachine)

Jul 13

inspissate

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-SPIS-ayt) 

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To thicken or condense.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin inspissare (to thicken), from spissus (thick). Earliest documented use: 1603.

USAGE:
"These are flavors that have been inspissating in some timeless tandoor for hours, days — decades."
Brad Leithauser; And an Outpost on Rodeo Drive; The New York Times; Mar 5, 1995. 

See more usage examples of inspissate in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 13
INSPISSATE

cocker

PRONUNCIATION:
(KAHK-uhr) 

MEANING:
verb tr.: To pamper or spoil.
noun: A breed of small spaniel dog.
ETYMOLOGY:
For verb: Of obscure origin. Earliest documented use: 1499.
For noun: From the use of such dogs in hunting of birds such as woodcock. Earliest documented use: 1811.

USAGE:
"Parents, by humouring and cockering them when little, corrupt the principles of nature in their children, and wonder afterwards to taste the bitter waters, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain."
John Locke (1632-1704). 

See more usage examples of cocker in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 13
COCKER
huffingtonpost:

SOMEONE INVENTED ‘SEINFELD’ EMOJI, AND THEY’RE BRINGING US SERENITY NOW
The group behind the Seinfeld2000 Twitter and Instagram accounts, which explore what it would be like if “Seinfeld” had never ended, has developed a new set of emoji inspired by the show, according to Uproxx. 
See the puffy shirt in emoji form here.

Summer of George
Jul 11

huffingtonpost:

SOMEONE INVENTED ‘SEINFELD’ EMOJI, AND THEY’RE BRINGING US SERENITY NOW

The group behind the Seinfeld2000 Twitter and Instagram accounts, which explore what it would be like if “Seinfeld” had never ended, has developed a new set of emoji inspired by the show, according to Uproxx. 

See the puffy shirt in emoji form here.

Summer of George

Jul 11

(Source: nylonpinksy, via thatkindofwoman)

assonance

PRONUNCIATION:
(AS-uh-nuhns) 

MEANING:
noun: The use of words with same or similar vowel sounds but with different end consonants.
Example: The o sounds in Wordsworth’s “A host, of golden daffodils.”
ETYMOLOGY:
Via French, from Latin ad- (to) + sonare (to sound), from sonus (sound). Ultimately from the Indo-European root swen- (to sound), which also gave us sound, sonic, sonnet, sonata, and unison. Earliest documented use: 1728.

USAGE:
"The passage offers many beauties: the nearly incantatory repetition, the assonance (define and confine, streets and treat, space and faces), the homophones (rains and reins — but not reigns?), the pun (no sign of motorway)."
Kevin Dettmar; Less Is Morrissey; The Chronicle of Higher Education (Washington, DC); Dec 9, 2013. 
Jul 9
ASSONANCE

formicate

PRONUNCIATION:
(FOR-mi-kayt) 

MEANING:
verb intr.:
1. To crawl like ants.
2. To swarm with ants.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin formicare (to crawl like ants), from formica (ant). Earliest documented use: 1854.

USAGE:
"Again, again, again, until you reach the inevitable conclusion of sky-rises, nuclear submarines, orbiting satellites, and Homo sapiens formicating the Earth."
Laird Barron; Shiva, Open Your Eye; Fantasy & Science Fiction (Cornwall, Connecticut); Sep 2001. 
Jul 9
FORMICATE

hortatory

PRONUNCIATION:
(HOR-tuh-tor-ee) 

MEANING:
adjective: Strongly urging.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin hortari (to urge). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gher- (to like or want), which also gave us yearn, charisma, greedy, and exhort. Earliest documented use: 1586.

USAGE:
"Of course, the book has its morals, just not hortatory ones."
More Than Just a Phunny Phellow; The Economist (London, UK); Apr 15, 2010.

"There are hortatory slogans painted along the architrave."
Will Self; Real Meals; New Statesman (London, UK); Oct 25, 2013.
Jul 9
HORTATORY

magnifico

PRONUNCIATION:
(mag-NIF-i-ko) 

MEANING:
noun: A person of high rank or position.
ETYMOLOGY:
Earlier magnifico was an honorary title applied to Venetian noblemen. From Italian magnifico (magnificent), from Latin magnus (great). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meg- (great), which is also the source of magnificent, maharajah, master, mayor, maestro, magnate, magistrate, maximum, magnify, micklemahatmamagnanimous, and hermetic. Earliest documented use: 1573.

USAGE:
"All the magnificos emerge looking banally ordinary."
Peter Schjeldahl; Beasts: The Art World; The New Yorker; May 17, 2010. 

See more usage examples of magnifico in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 4
MAGNIFICO

autodidact

PRONUNCIATION:
(ah-to-DY-dakt) 

MEANING:
noun: A self-taught person.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek autodidaktos (self-taught), from autos (self) + didaktos (taught). Earliest documented use: 1534.

USAGE:
"Tom didn’t do particularly well in school because of problems with attention disorder, hyperactivity, and even a streak of mischievousness. Instead, he became an autodidact, using his intense interest in reading to educate himself."
Sharon Salyer; He Was the Love of Her Life; The Herald (Everett, Washington); May 7, 2014. 

See more usage examples of autodidact in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 4
AUTODIDACT

"It is looking at things for a long time that ripens you and gives you a deeper meaning."

- Vincent van Gogh (via quotes-shape-us)

Jul 1