FRATERNAL FILMS
fuckyeahairplaness:

Sydney

Love love want to go back.
Sep 1

fuckyeahairplaness:

Sydney

Love love want to go back.

everyones-asuspect:

Note to self. #reminder #amypoehler #sgatp @amypoehlersmartgirls
Sep 1

everyones-asuspect:

Note to self. #reminder #amypoehler #sgatp @amypoehlersmartgirls

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

"If I had not created my whole world, I would certainly have died in other people’s."

- Anais Nin  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: psych-facts, via thatkindofwoman)

Sep 1
condenasttraveler:







The Great East African Safari Experience


yes yes yes yes yes
Aug 29

condenasttraveler:

yes yes yes yes yes

huffingtonpost:

These guys are WORTH protecting - particularly if it means we get more ridiculously incredible videos like this one. Watch this giraffe try to ride a motorcycle here.

Love it
Aug 28

huffingtonpost:

These guys are WORTH protecting - particularly if it means we get more ridiculously incredible videos like this one. Watch this giraffe try to ride a motorcycle here.

Love it

degust

PRONUNCIATION:
(di-GUHST) 

MEANING:
verb tr.: To taste or savor appreciatively.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin degustare (to taste), from de- (completely) + gustare (to taste). Ultimately from the Indo-European root geus- (to taste or choose), which also gave us choice, choose, gusto, ragout, and disgust. Earliest documented use: 1623.

USAGE:
"Within a decade, the first insects [beetles] crossed the western border of the Soviet Union to degust Ukrainian and Belarusan potatoes."
Laura Williams; The Bug That Brought Russia to its Knees; Russian Life (Montpelier, Vermont); Jul/Aug 2007. 

See more usage examples of degust in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 27
DEGUST

pulchritudinous  

\puhl-kri-TOOD-n-uhs, -TYOOD-\adjective


1. physically beautiful; comely.QuotesJazz buffs with glorious vocabularies wrote long and often boring tributes to thepulchritudinous Lady Day, her phrasing and incredibly intricate harmonics.
— Maya Angelou, The Heart of a Woman, 1981

OriginPulchritudinous is built on the Latin word for “beautiful,” pulcher. The noun pulchritudeentered English in the mid-1400s; pulchritudinous did not gain traction in the US until the late 1800s.

Aug 27
PULCHRITUDINOUS
Aug 26

theacademy:

A story should have a beginning, a middle and an end… but not necessarily in that order.
- Jean-Luc Godard

fungible

PRONUNCIATION:
(FUHN-juh-buhl) 

MEANING:
adjective: Interchangeable.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin fungi (to perform in place). Earliest documented use: 1765.

NOTES:
When you lend someone a dollar bill, you don’t care if he returns the same bill or a different one because money is fungible. Same with things such as gold, a cup of sugar, etc. However, if you lend someone your cell phone, you wouldn’t be pleased if he returned a different phone even if it’s exactly the same model. That would be an example of something nonfungible.

USAGE:
"Forbidden to own land for most of our two millennia of exile, we gradually became experts in accumulating capital, which is portable, easily inheritable, fungible, and expandable."
Ellen Frankel; Taking Stock; The Jerusalem Report (Israel); May 19, 2014. 
Aug 18
FUNGIBLE

presentiment

PRONUNCIATION:
(pri-ZEN-tuh-ment) 

MEANING:
noun: A sense that something is going to happen, especially something bad.
ETYMOLOGY:
From French pressentiment (premonition), from pressentir (to have a premonition), from Latin pre- (before) + sentire (to feel). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sent- (to head for or to go), that is also the source for send, scent, sense, sentence, assent, consent, and ressentiment. Earliest documented use: 1663.

USAGE:
"That the reader has a presentiment of what will happen doesn’t necessarily impoverish its affecting mystery."
Ten White Geese; The New Yorker; Mar 11, 2013. 
Aug 18
PRESENTIMENT

"… if there is one thing female entrepreneurs have in common, it’s that they persist even in the face of gender prejudice."

-

What Do All Female Entrepreneurs Have in Common? 

by Melissa Phipps in the General Assembly blog

(via bbglasses)

(via bbglasses)

Aug 17
My love.
Aug 17

My love.

(Source: flickr.com, via prettystuff)

capitulate
"I’ll do whatever you want… please just don’t tickle my belly!"

capitulate

PRONUNCIATION:
(kuh-PICH-uh-layt) 

MEANING:
verb intr.: To cease resisting; surrender.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin capitulare (to draw up under headings [the articles of agreement]), from capitulum (little head, chapter), from caput (head). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kaput- (head), also the origin of head, captain, chef, chapter, cadet, cattle, chattel, achieve, biceps, mischief, and occiput, (but not of kaput). Earliest documented use: 1537.

USAGE:
"Hard fighting continued for two months, until the Poles were forced finally to capitulate on 2 October 1944."
Richard Evans; Bloodbath Before Dawn; New Statesman (London, UK); Oct 18, 2013. 

See more usage examples of capitulate in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 14
CAPITULATE
Aug 12

tribecafilm:

Under The Hood: ‘Black Swan’ & Familiar Narratives In New Environments

Good to know.

(via foxsearchlightpictures)

inveigle

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-VAY-guhl, -VEE-) 

MEANING:
verb tr.: To get something or to persuade someone to do something by deception or flattery.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French aveugle (blind), from Latin ab- (away from) + oculus (eye). Earliest documented use: 1513.

USAGE:
"The Internet has changed the way new late-night hosts inveigle their ways into the hearts of fans."
Bill Carter; Familiar Night Bird Reclaims a Perch; The New York Times; Sep 9, 2013. 

See more usage examples of inveigle in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 11
INVEIGLE