FRATERNAL FILMS
glamour:

via Pinterest
Jul 31

glamour:

via Pinterest

Jul 31

foxsearchlightpictures:

Birdman
10.17.14

Jul 31

bandh:

How does one improve upon a camera that was viewed by many as still the top in its class?

(Hands-On Review: Nikon D810 via B&H Explora)

Jul 31

tuneage:

#tbt: Here Comes Your Man — Pixies

The Pixies, some old school American alternative rock, broke into the industry with this classic. Featured on their demo tape in 1987, this song comes replete with guitar riffs and melodic lyrics. Their music seems similar to some older British alternative (probably why they reached a higher popularity over in the UK) and they have some really catchy tunes. Though they weren’t as commercially big as they could have been, everyone should enjoy these guys.

Look at that beautiful Arriflex.
Jul 31

Look at that beautiful Arriflex.

(Source: everythingkubrick, via theacademy)

"The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry."

- Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms (via quotes-shape-us)

Jul 30
Jul 29

entertainmentweekly:

Community: Im-Posters for 9 Signature Episodes

#SixSeasonsAndAMovie? EW's Darren Franich and Jef Castro imagine promo art inspired by classics. 

LOVE THIS SOOOOOOO MUCH. I WANT THEM ALL!!!!

"To forget the dead would be akin to killing them a second time."

- Elie Wiesel, Night (via quotes-shape-us)

Jul 29
Jul 29

theacademy:

Siskel & Ebert

My heart. 😍😍💗❤️💚💜💙💛💓💕💞💘💋💌🎬🎥📺📼📹💝👎👍

rachelzoe:

Richard Avedon 

This is everything.
Jul 26

rachelzoe:

Richard Avedon 

This is everything.

rounceval or rouncival
PRONUNCIATION:
(ROUN-si-vuhl) 

MEANING:
adjective: Big or strong.
noun: Someone or something that is large.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Roncesvalles, a town at the foot of the Pyrenees. It was the site of the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778 in which Roland, a commander of Charlemagne’s army, was defeated by the Basques. Over time the story turned into a legend and giant bones of prehistoric animals discovered there were claimed to be those of heroes slain at the battle. Earliest documented use: 1570.

USAGE:
"She was a big girl, a rouncival, Desroches called her."
Dolors Tool; Appetite for Murder; Breakwater Books; 2002.

"Gold ingots the size of rounceval peas, they say. Oh, and there’s another curious aspect to the legend."
Louis Bayard; The School of Night; Henry Holt and Co.; 2010.
Jul 25
ROUNCEVAL

hemidemisemiquaver

\hem-ee-dem-ee-SEM-ee-kwey-ver\noun
1. Music. Chiefly British. a sixty-fourth note.
Quotes:
Their gaiety consisted of ruling staves and copying aborrowed duet filled with hemidemisemiquavers .
 Patrick O’Brian, Master and Commander 1969
Anything could follow, a hemidemisemiquaver  or awhole note; and the translator was charged withinterpreting the score.
 Ward Just, The Translator 1991
Origin:
Hemidemisemiquaver  entered English in the mid-1800s, as an extension of demisemiquave a thirty-second note. A quaver  is chiefly British word for aneighth note.
Jul 25
HEMIDEMISEMIQUAVER

damson

PRONUNCIATION:
(DAM-zuhn, -suhn) 

MEANING:
noun:
1. A variety of small plum (Prunus insititia) or its fruit.
2. A dark purple color.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin Prunum Damascenum (plum of Damascus), perhaps because it was first cultivated in Damascus or because it was introduced into Europe from Syria. Two other words coined after Damascus are damask and damascene. Earliest documented use: 1398.

USAGE:
"The mind I love must have wild places, a tangled orchard where dark damsons drop in the heavy grass, an overgrown little wood, the chance of a snake or two, a pool that nobody’s fathomed the depth of, and paths threaded with flowers planted by the mind."
The Journal of Katherine Mansfield; Knopf; 1927.

"She put a studded denim cropped jacket on over her favourite purple maxi-dress … An extra slick of damson lip gloss completed the look."
Coleen Nolan; Denial; Macmillan; 2011. 
Jul 25
DAMSON

proem

PRONUNCIATION:
(PRO-uhm, -em) 

MEANING:
noun: An introduction, preface, or preamble.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French proeme, from Latin prooemium, from Greek prooimion, from pro- (before) + oime (song). Earliest documented use: 1410.

USAGE:
"However, if one carries on reading beyond the proem and carefully examines the main body …"
Eleni Kechagia; Plutarch Against Colotes; Oxford University Press; 2011.
Jul 20
PROEM
Jul 20

This is why I love her.

(Source: katemiddletons, via middletonlove)