FRATERNAL FILMS
rounceval or rouncival
PRONUNCIATION:
(ROUN-si-vuhl) 

MEANING:
adjective: Big or strong.
noun: Someone or something that is large.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Roncesvalles, a town at the foot of the Pyrenees. It was the site of the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778 in which Roland, a commander of Charlemagne’s army, was defeated by the Basques. Over time the story turned into a legend and giant bones of prehistoric animals discovered there were claimed to be those of heroes slain at the battle. Earliest documented use: 1570.

USAGE:
"She was a big girl, a rouncival, Desroches called her."
Dolors Tool; Appetite for Murder; Breakwater Books; 2002.

"Gold ingots the size of rounceval peas, they say. Oh, and there’s another curious aspect to the legend."
Louis Bayard; The School of Night; Henry Holt and Co.; 2010.
Jul 25
ROUNCEVAL

hemidemisemiquaver

\hem-ee-dem-ee-SEM-ee-kwey-ver\noun
1. Music. Chiefly British. a sixty-fourth note.
Quotes:
Their gaiety consisted of ruling staves and copying aborrowed duet filled with hemidemisemiquavers .
 Patrick O’Brian, Master and Commander 1969
Anything could follow, a hemidemisemiquaver  or awhole note; and the translator was charged withinterpreting the score.
 Ward Just, The Translator 1991
Origin:
Hemidemisemiquaver  entered English in the mid-1800s, as an extension of demisemiquave a thirty-second note. A quaver  is chiefly British word for aneighth note.
Jul 25
HEMIDEMISEMIQUAVER

damson

PRONUNCIATION:
(DAM-zuhn, -suhn) 

MEANING:
noun:
1. A variety of small plum (Prunus insititia) or its fruit.
2. A dark purple color.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin Prunum Damascenum (plum of Damascus), perhaps because it was first cultivated in Damascus or because it was introduced into Europe from Syria. Two other words coined after Damascus are damask and damascene. Earliest documented use: 1398.

USAGE:
"The mind I love must have wild places, a tangled orchard where dark damsons drop in the heavy grass, an overgrown little wood, the chance of a snake or two, a pool that nobody’s fathomed the depth of, and paths threaded with flowers planted by the mind."
The Journal of Katherine Mansfield; Knopf; 1927.

"She put a studded denim cropped jacket on over her favourite purple maxi-dress … An extra slick of damson lip gloss completed the look."
Coleen Nolan; Denial; Macmillan; 2011. 
Jul 25
DAMSON

proem

PRONUNCIATION:
(PRO-uhm, -em) 

MEANING:
noun: An introduction, preface, or preamble.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French proeme, from Latin prooemium, from Greek prooimion, from pro- (before) + oime (song). Earliest documented use: 1410.

USAGE:
"However, if one carries on reading beyond the proem and carefully examines the main body …"
Eleni Kechagia; Plutarch Against Colotes; Oxford University Press; 2011.
Jul 20
PROEM
Jul 20

This is why I love her.

(Source: katemiddletons, via middletonlove)

Jul 20

(Source: textonly, via tribecafilm)

Jul 20

"Play! Invent the world! Invent reality!"

- Vladimir Nabokov (via itsquoted)

Jul 20

"Learn to value yourself, which means: fight for your happiness."

- Ayn Rand (via quotes-shape-us)

Jul 19
fuckyeahmovieposters:

Ghostbusters
Jul 18

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Ghostbusters

factitious

PRONUNCIATION:
(fak-TISH-uhs) 

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Artificial.
2. Sham.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin facticius (artificial), past participle of facere (to do). Earliest documented use: 1646.

USAGE:
“‘For me, this is the only real place,’ David says in the novel, but for the reader the city remains disappointingly factitious.”
Say Nice Things About Detroit; The New Yorker; Aug 27, 2012. 

See more usage examples of factitious in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 17
FACTITIOUS

secretory

PRONUNCIATION:
(si-KREE-tuh-ree) 

MEANING:
adjective: Relating to the release of a substance from a cell, gland, or an organ.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin secernere (to distinguish), from se- (apart) + cernere (to sift). Ultimately from the Indo-European root krei- (to sift or to discriminate), which also gave us crime, crisis, certain, excrement, secret, critic, garble, hypocrisy, and diacritical. Earliest documented use: 1692.

USAGE:
"The secret behind such organised societies is communication through the use of around 20 pheromones, emitted by ants’ secretory organs."
Wisdom of Crowds; The Economist (London, UK); Apr 8, 2009. 

See more usage examples of secretory in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 17
SECRETORY

grogram

PRONUNCIATION:
(GROG-ruhm) 

MEANING:
noun: A coarse fabric of silk, combined with mohair or wool, and often stiffened with gum.
ETYMOLOGY:
From French gros grain (large or coarse grain). Another fabric from the same origin is grosgrain. Earliest documented use: 1562.

USAGE:
"Instead of putting her still-thick, white hair into its usual twist, she’d tied it back at the nape of her neck with a black, grogram ribbon."
Nancy Desrosiers; Stay a Little Longer; Tate Publishing; 2011. 

See more usage examples of grogram in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Jul 17
GROGRAM

vizard or visard

PRONUNCIATION:
(VIZ-uhrd) 

MEANING:
noun: A visor, mask, or disguise.
ETYMOLOGY:
A variant of visor, from Anglo-French viser, from vis (face), from visus (sight), from videre (to see). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weid- (to see), which is also the source of guide, wise, vision, advice, idea, story, history, previsepolyhistor,invidioushadeseidos, and eidetic. Earliest documented use: 1555.

USAGE:
"The birds wear floor-length costumes, and Princess Victoria actually comes from the Veneto, bearing a vizard (the beaked plague-doctor’s mask)."
The ABC of Fabulous Princesses; Kirkus Reviews (New York); Dec 15, 2013.
Jul 17
VIZARD
Jul 16

Brit Marling on writing her own scripts.

(Source: kittyypryde, via foxsearchlightpictures)