FRATERNAL FILMS
condenasttraveler:

Necking, Africa style, at Elsa’s Kopje, in Meru National Park.

LOVE!!!
Apr 23

condenasttraveler:

Necking, Africa style, at Elsa’s Kopje, in Meru National Park.

LOVE!!!

Apr 23

thefinalimage:

The “Best Picture” Losers: A Final Image Montage (with years)

86 “Best Picture” runnerups, losers, (or should’ve won) and the year they lost 

(3:12)

[Film titles here]

(Source: pastpicturerewind)

impecunious

PRONUNCIATION:
(im-pi-KYOO-nee-uhs) 

MEANING:
adjective: Having little or no money.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin im- (not) + pecunia (money), from pecus (cattle). Ultimately from the Indo-European root peku- (wealth), which also gave us fee, fief, fellow, peculiar, impecunious, and pecuniary. Earliest documented use: 1596.

USAGE:
"The children have no mother, and their father is impecunious, so they have embarked on a series of adventurous money-making schemes."
James Wood; The New Curiosity Shop; The New Yorker; Oct 21, 2013.

"Discounts for the clever or impecunious greatly reduce the sticker price at many universities."
Is College Worth It?; The Economist (London, UK); Apr 5, 2014. 

See more usage examples of impecunious in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 23
IMPECUNIOUS

bombastic

PRONUNCIATION:
(bom-BAS-tik) 

MEANING:
adjective: Pompous or pretentious (in speech or writing).
ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French bombace (cotton padding), from Latin bombax (cotton). Earliest documented use: 1704.

USAGE:
"Mr. Satya Nadella is a leader with a low-key style that differs from Mr. Ballmer’s bombastic manner."
Nick Wingfield; Microsoft Names New Chief; The New York Times; Feb 4, 2014. 

See more usage examples of bombastic in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 23
BOMBASTIC

tractable

PRONUNCIATION:
(TRAK-tuh-buhl) 

MEANING:
adjective: Easily handled, managed, or controlled.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin tractare (to handle), frequentative of trahere (draw). Earliest documented use: 1504.

USAGE:
“‘I don’t want to go there,’ said Sharina, who was normally such a tractable child.”
Susan Palwick; Hhasalin; Fantasy & Science Fiction (Cornwall, Connecticut); Sep/Oct 2013. 

See more usage examples of tractable in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 23
TRACTABLE
Apr 19

 I read somewhere that there’s a difference between tears of joy and tears of rage. Is that true? It’s in the chemistry, but you can’t tell by looking, they all just look like tears.

-Side Effects (2013)

I love retired Soderbergh.

(Source: wearyvoices, via cinematographic)

Apr 19

(Source: imtaurus)

Prospero

PRONUNCIATION:
(PROS-puh-roh) 

MEANING:
noun: Someone who is capable of influencing others’ behavior or perceptions without their being aware of it.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan and a magician, in Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Earliest documented use: 1785.

USAGE:
"Melliora is the Prospero who engineers a return to social order entirely in accord with her desires."
David Oakleaf (ed.), Eliza Haywood; Love in Excess; Broadview Press; 2000.
Apr 18
PROSPERO

"I will not belittle my achievements."

- 7 words or less affirmation for this week (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: yourpersonalcheerleader, via thatkindofwoman)

Apr 18

"Write. Write until it stops hurting."

- Six Word Story #40 by absentions (via absentions)

(via writingcircles)

Apr 18
Apr 16

galehawthorn:

“This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you.” - Don McLean (Starry, Starry Night)

(Source: tessascarstairs, via abandon-everything)

Timon

PRONUNCIATION:
(TY-muhn) 

MEANING:
noun: One who hates or distrusts humankind.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Timon, the misanthropic hero of Shakespeare’s play Timon of Athens. Earliest documented use: 1598.

USAGE:
"My soul was swallowed up in bitterness and hate … I saw nothing to do but live apart like a Timon."
Upton Sinclair; Prince Hagen; Heinemann; 1903.
Apr 16
TIMON

Portia

PRONUNCIATION:
(POR-shuh, -shee-uh) 

MEANING:
noun: A female lawyer.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Portia, the heroine of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. Portia is a rich heiress who disguises herself as a lawyer to save Antonio’s life. Earliest documented use: 1869.

USAGE:
“‘Listen sister…law isn’t the only subject I’ve mastered!’ snaps Betty, … ‘I may be a Portia, but my middle name’s Dempsey!’”
Mike Madrid; Divas, Dames & Daredevils; Exterminating Angel Press; 2013.
Apr 16
PORTIA
Apr 15

pbstv:

Tonight, from Ken Burns — see the premiere of The Address at 9/8c.

This film uncovers how Lincoln’s historic words motivate students a century-and-a-half later.

Apr 14

(Source: bluemavor, via tribecafilm)