FRATERNAL FILMS
condenasttraveler:







The Great East African Safari Experience


yes yes yes yes yes
Aug 29

condenasttraveler:

yes yes yes yes yes

huffingtonpost:

These guys are WORTH protecting - particularly if it means we get more ridiculously incredible videos like this one. Watch this giraffe try to ride a motorcycle here.

Love it
Aug 28

huffingtonpost:

These guys are WORTH protecting - particularly if it means we get more ridiculously incredible videos like this one. Watch this giraffe try to ride a motorcycle here.

Love it

degust

PRONUNCIATION:
(di-GUHST) 

MEANING:
verb tr.: To taste or savor appreciatively.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin degustare (to taste), from de- (completely) + gustare (to taste). Ultimately from the Indo-European root geus- (to taste or choose), which also gave us choice, choose, gusto, ragout, and disgust. Earliest documented use: 1623.

USAGE:
"Within a decade, the first insects [beetles] crossed the western border of the Soviet Union to degust Ukrainian and Belarusan potatoes."
Laura Williams; The Bug That Brought Russia to its Knees; Russian Life (Montpelier, Vermont); Jul/Aug 2007. 

See more usage examples of degust in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 27
DEGUST

pulchritudinous  

\puhl-kri-TOOD-n-uhs, -TYOOD-\adjective


1. physically beautiful; comely.QuotesJazz buffs with glorious vocabularies wrote long and often boring tributes to thepulchritudinous Lady Day, her phrasing and incredibly intricate harmonics.
— Maya Angelou, The Heart of a Woman, 1981

OriginPulchritudinous is built on the Latin word for “beautiful,” pulcher. The noun pulchritudeentered English in the mid-1400s; pulchritudinous did not gain traction in the US until the late 1800s.

Aug 27
PULCHRITUDINOUS
Aug 26

theacademy:

A story should have a beginning, a middle and an end… but not necessarily in that order.
- Jean-Luc Godard

fungible

PRONUNCIATION:
(FUHN-juh-buhl) 

MEANING:
adjective: Interchangeable.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin fungi (to perform in place). Earliest documented use: 1765.

NOTES:
When you lend someone a dollar bill, you don’t care if he returns the same bill or a different one because money is fungible. Same with things such as gold, a cup of sugar, etc. However, if you lend someone your cell phone, you wouldn’t be pleased if he returned a different phone even if it’s exactly the same model. That would be an example of something nonfungible.

USAGE:
"Forbidden to own land for most of our two millennia of exile, we gradually became experts in accumulating capital, which is portable, easily inheritable, fungible, and expandable."
Ellen Frankel; Taking Stock; The Jerusalem Report (Israel); May 19, 2014. 
Aug 18
FUNGIBLE

presentiment

PRONUNCIATION:
(pri-ZEN-tuh-ment) 

MEANING:
noun: A sense that something is going to happen, especially something bad.
ETYMOLOGY:
From French pressentiment (premonition), from pressentir (to have a premonition), from Latin pre- (before) + sentire (to feel). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sent- (to head for or to go), that is also the source for send, scent, sense, sentence, assent, consent, and ressentiment. Earliest documented use: 1663.

USAGE:
"That the reader has a presentiment of what will happen doesn’t necessarily impoverish its affecting mystery."
Ten White Geese; The New Yorker; Mar 11, 2013. 
Aug 18
PRESENTIMENT

"… if there is one thing female entrepreneurs have in common, it’s that they persist even in the face of gender prejudice."

-

What Do All Female Entrepreneurs Have in Common? 

by Melissa Phipps in the General Assembly blog

(via bbglasses)

(via bbglasses)

Aug 17
My love.
Aug 17

My love.

(Source: flickr.com, via prettystuff)

capitulate
"I’ll do whatever you want… please just don’t tickle my belly!"

capitulate

PRONUNCIATION:
(kuh-PICH-uh-layt) 

MEANING:
verb intr.: To cease resisting; surrender.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin capitulare (to draw up under headings [the articles of agreement]), from capitulum (little head, chapter), from caput (head). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kaput- (head), also the origin of head, captain, chef, chapter, cadet, cattle, chattel, achieve, biceps, mischief, and occiput, (but not of kaput). Earliest documented use: 1537.

USAGE:
"Hard fighting continued for two months, until the Poles were forced finally to capitulate on 2 October 1944."
Richard Evans; Bloodbath Before Dawn; New Statesman (London, UK); Oct 18, 2013. 

See more usage examples of capitulate in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 14
CAPITULATE
Aug 12

tribecafilm:

Under The Hood: ‘Black Swan’ & Familiar Narratives In New Environments

Good to know.

(via foxsearchlightpictures)

inveigle

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-VAY-guhl, -VEE-) 

MEANING:
verb tr.: To get something or to persuade someone to do something by deception or flattery.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French aveugle (blind), from Latin ab- (away from) + oculus (eye). Earliest documented use: 1513.

USAGE:
"The Internet has changed the way new late-night hosts inveigle their ways into the hearts of fans."
Bill Carter; Familiar Night Bird Reclaims a Perch; The New York Times; Sep 9, 2013. 

See more usage examples of inveigle in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 11
INVEIGLE

bailiwick

PRONUNCIATION:
(BAY-luh-wik, -lee-) 

MEANING:
noun: A person’s area of expertise or interest.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Middle English bailliwik, from bailie (bailiff), from bail (custody), from Latin baiulare (to serve as porter) + Middle English wick (dairy farm or village), from Old English wic (house or village), from Latin vicus (neighborhood). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weik- (clan), which is also the forebear of vicinity, village, villa, and villain (originally, a villain was a farm servant, one who lived in a villa or a country house), ecumenical, and ecesis. Earliest documented use: 1460.

USAGE:
"Ms. Sarah Palin took the extraordinary step Tuesday of filing an ethics complaint against herself, making the matter fall within the bailiwick of the personnel board. Her lawyer Mr. Van Flein then asked the Legislature to drop its inquiry."
Peter S. Goodman and Michael Moss; Alaska Lawmakers to Seek Subpoenas in Palin Inquiry; The New York Times; Sep 6, 2008. 

See more usage examples of bailiwick in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Aug 11
BAILIWICK

"Dig deep and empower yourself today. Stand in your inner strength. Be uniquely you."

- Amy Leigh Mercree (via quotes-shape-us)

Aug 9
Aug 8

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

(via neil-gaiman)