FRATERNAL FILMS
Apr 19

 I read somewhere that there’s a difference between tears of joy and tears of rage. Is that true? It’s in the chemistry, but you can’t tell by looking, they all just look like tears.

-Side Effects (2013)

I love retired Soderbergh.

(Source: wearyvoices, via cinematographic)

Apr 19

(Source: imtaurus)

Prospero

PRONUNCIATION:
(PROS-puh-roh) 

MEANING:
noun: Someone who is capable of influencing others’ behavior or perceptions without their being aware of it.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan and a magician, in Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Earliest documented use: 1785.

USAGE:
"Melliora is the Prospero who engineers a return to social order entirely in accord with her desires."
David Oakleaf (ed.), Eliza Haywood; Love in Excess; Broadview Press; 2000.
Apr 18
PROSPERO

"I will not belittle my achievements."

- 7 words or less affirmation for this week (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: yourpersonalcheerleader, via thatkindofwoman)

Apr 18

"Write. Write until it stops hurting."

- Six Word Story #40 by absentions (via absentions)

(via writingcircles)

Apr 18
Apr 16

galehawthorn:

“This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you.” - Don McLean (Starry, Starry Night)

(Source: tessascarstairs, via abandon-everything)

Timon

PRONUNCIATION:
(TY-muhn) 

MEANING:
noun: One who hates or distrusts humankind.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Timon, the misanthropic hero of Shakespeare’s play Timon of Athens. Earliest documented use: 1598.

USAGE:
"My soul was swallowed up in bitterness and hate … I saw nothing to do but live apart like a Timon."
Upton Sinclair; Prince Hagen; Heinemann; 1903.
Apr 16
TIMON

Portia

PRONUNCIATION:
(POR-shuh, -shee-uh) 

MEANING:
noun: A female lawyer.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Portia, the heroine of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. Portia is a rich heiress who disguises herself as a lawyer to save Antonio’s life. Earliest documented use: 1869.

USAGE:
“‘Listen sister…law isn’t the only subject I’ve mastered!’ snaps Betty, … ‘I may be a Portia, but my middle name’s Dempsey!’”
Mike Madrid; Divas, Dames & Daredevils; Exterminating Angel Press; 2013.
Apr 16
PORTIA
Apr 15

pbstv:

Tonight, from Ken Burns — see the premiere of The Address at 9/8c.

This film uncovers how Lincoln’s historic words motivate students a century-and-a-half later.

Apr 14

(Source: bluemavor, via tribecafilm)

Dogberry

PRONUNCIATION:
(DOG-ber-ee, -buh-ree) 

MEANING:
noun: A pompous, incompetent, self-important official.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Dogberry, a constable in Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, in which he goes about his blundering ways while mouthing malapropisms http://wordsmith.org/words/malapropism.html . Earliest documented use: 1801.

USAGE:
"Why doesn’t he do something, then? Ignorant Dogberry! Useless bumpkin! Calls himself a copper and doesn’t even know where to start!"
Edmund Crispin; The Glimpses of the Moon; Gollancz; 1977.

"The mayor of Bangor, Maine, vetoed a time-altering resolution passed by its city council … for which Railway Age lampooned him in an editorial that began ‘A Dogberry who holds the office of mayor.’"
Jack Beatty; Age of Betrayal; Knopf; 2007.
Apr 13
DOGBERRY

"Words are loaded pistols."

- Jean-Paul Sartre (via quotes-shape-us)

Apr 13

sashay

PRONUNCIATION:
(sa-SHAY) 

MEANING:
verb intr.:
1. To move, walk, or glide along nonchalantly.
2. To strut or move in a showy manner.
ETYMOLOGY:
From switching of syllables in a mispronunciation of French chassé (a ballet movement involving gliding steps with the same foot always leading), past participle of chasser (to chase), from captare (to try to catch), frequentative of Latin capere (to take). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kap- (to grasp), which also gave us captive, capsule, chassis, cable, occupy, deceive, behoof, caitiffpercipientcaptious, and gaff. Earliest documented use: 1836.

USAGE:
"Tyler switched to 6th Street, the car swaying and sashaying through the leafy old homes of Hancock Park."
Denise Hamilton; Damage Control; Scribner; 2011. 
Apr 11
SASHAY

viperine

PRONUNCIATION:
(VY-puhr-in, -puh-ryn) 

MEANING:
adjective: Of or relating to a viper; venomous; malicious.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin vipera (snake), which arose from a mispronunciation/contraction of vivipera, from vivus (alive) + parere (to give birth). Vipers are named so because most vipers give birth to live young (instead of eggs). The eggs stay within the mother’s body till they are ready to hatch. Earliest documented use: around 1540.

USAGE:
"The musical taught a generation of viperine office politicians how to stick a shiv into their bosses without leaving any fingerprints on the handle."
Terry Teachout; Lovable, Huggable, and Unscrupulous Too; The Wall Street Journal (New York); Mar 29, 2011. 

See more usage examples of viperine in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.
Apr 11
VIPERINE